Tag Archives: motivators

communicating-effectively

Leading by Effectively Communicating

As a part of my executive coaching practice, I use a DISC/Motivators assessment tool to help identify the natural behavioral tendencies and the personal motivations of my clients. During most of my years as a coach, I was adamantly opposed to “recommending some online assessment that will slap a label on my clients and pop them into boxes.” Coaching is about growth and change and the antithesis of living in a box. I had my speech and I was committed to it.

A couple of years ago a business partner challenged me to learn more about the value of this work, and I subsequently became a behavioral/motivators analyst. What turned me around? When you know how you normally behave and what motivates you, and you understand how you differ from others, you can adjust your communication so that others can understand you. The concept is as simple as knowing your native tongue very well, while at the same time learning a few key words from a variety of primary world languages so that you can effectively communicate.

Leadership Skill: Lead by effectively communicating.

Over the next few months we will explore how different people respond when they face four situations that are common to everyone:

  • problems or challenges
  • the desire to influence someone
  • change and setting pace
  • rules that have been set by someone else

Your natural way of responding shapes your behavioral style.  How you walk. How you talk. How you shop. How you drive. How you play.

We will also consider why you do what you do, i.e. what gets you out of bed in the morning. We will consider six categories:

  • thirst for knowledge
  • commitment to never wasting money, time, energy
  • desire for harmony and beauty
  • longing to help others
  • drive to lead
  • focus on tradition

Human beings are much more complex than what any assessment can tell us about how we tend to behave or what motivates us. This work offers you broad strokes to understand yourself and others for the purpose of communicating more effectively.

How are you doing, 0 – 10, leading by effectively communicating?

Since I spend a significant amount of time doing team workshops and 1:1 training on this topic, I am constantly aware of communicating with family and friends, as well as clients, with language that fits how they behave and what motivates them. I get better at it every year and find the key is taking a moment to clearly listen, not just be thinking about what I want to say.

In anticipation of adding new communication tools these next few months, I invite you to choose a couple of primary people in your life and notice how they behave, and what is important to them. It will be particularly interesting if you choose people with whom you struggle to communicate. I encourage you to suspend your natural tendency to judge anything that is different from you. That does not mean that there is never behavior that is good or bad, it just means that behavior that is different from yours is not, by definition, either bad or good. It is just different. Obviously, this is a core principle in effective communication.

Be excited. The info coming these next months has opened doors for executive teams around the world to take their communication skills to the next level and create highly successful organizations. You will find yourself applying it to the vital areas where you lead – work, community, and home!

- Mary Beth King

This article has been featured in Blue City Monthly

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Leading By Understanding Different Motivations

You know those people who are SO different from you? Who go on-and-on about things that make no sense to you? Put simply, different things matter to different people.

This month’s look at communication styles (as defined by the DISC/Motivators Assessment) invites you to consider which of the six motivators gets your motor running. Once you know that, you can figure out how to communicate effectively with those other people.

The six motivators:

1 – Theoretical. Seeks knowledge.

2 – Utilitarian. Seeks return on investment in everything.

3 – Aesthetic. Seeks harmony and beauty.

4 – Social. Seeks to help others reach their potential.

5 – Individualistic. Seeks leadership in order to advance their cause.

6 – Traditional. Seeks a system of order and structure.

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Motivators Wheel

Leadership skill: Communicate effectively with those who are driven by different motivators.

Imagine that you are planning to run a half marathon (or take a trip, or go for dinner at your favorite restaurant) and you want a friend to do it with you. Consider what you would say to your friend based on what motivates them:

1 – Theoretical. The Rock and Roll Half Marathon is on June 13, at 7:30 AM. The route starts at the Space Needle, goes through downtown to Columbia City, back north to I-90, through SODO, and back through downtown to the Space Needle. There are live bands all along the route. The price is $110, and that includes a T-shirt.

2 – Utilitarian. When you sign up, you know you will ratchet up your training program to be ready. You could set a personal best this year. You will be moving toward your goal of running a marathon. And you will be able to choose a charity to support that you know will use your money wisely.

3 – Aesthetic. The beautiful course takes you through vibrant Seattle, along the Sound where you will see the ferries gliding to the islands, and the Lake Washington coastline with glimpses of snowcapped mountains. The cacophony of music from live bands all along the way will be awesome. How cool to do it together.

4 – Social. It has been hard for me to find time to train for this race. We would be a great support to one another if we both committed to it.  And you will have an opportunity to contribute to a charity that you choose.

5 – Individualistic. I would like you to be the point person for the company sign-ups for this race. Our North Seattle division has challenged us to a competition. We need a leader who will encourage everyone to sign-up, focus on training, and bring in an average time that will trounce them.

6 – Traditional. This race, started in 1998, is now run in cities throughout the world. The Rock and Roll series is the most run in the United States. In Seattle last year, 12,000 runners crossed the finish line in the half marathon alone. The events include a Health and Fitness Expo and a spectacular concert that afternoon. What a support system they must have to pull this off.

How are you doing, 0 – 10, communicating with people with different motivators?

I am about a 5. I, along with the rest of the world, tend to lead my conversation from what motivates me. I invite all of us, especially when we are not seeing eye-to-eye, to consider what motivates each other. That most likely is the root of our differences, and a powerful key to understanding each other.

- Mary Beth King

This article was featured in Blue City Monthly

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Are You Motivated By Negativity?

The brain naturally gravitates toward the negative. A judgmental attitude is cancer to any relationship. Every working person knows how negativity wreaks havoc in the workplace and sends everyone home in a bad mood. As leaders we have the opportunity to train people to think differently and arm them with tools to think positively and appreciate diversity of thought.

In our leadership development workshops, the most helpful tool we have is the Personal Motivation and Engagement assessment. Have you taken it, yet? If not, talk to me because it cuts through all the noise to give you knowledge on how to understand your style.

At True Life, we use this assessment to identify a person’s top six motivators, which are made up of one’s beliefs, attitudes and values. Here is an example of just one of the motivators: The Individualistic.

You can join our You Tube channel to see the other motivators at your leisure. For now, suffice it to say, your top two motivators are what get you out of bed in the morning. They make you excited to take action on something that brings you joy — like making money, learning something new, helping a person in need, or making an impact on a large scale. The top two motivators are what we use to think positively, to move toward things we value.

Conversely, our bottom motivators may cause us to be judgmental and to be trapped in our own negative world of criticism. If we are not aware of what motivates us and equally what “de-motivates” us, we are in danger of criticizing others when they think and behave differently than we do.

Awareness of what our motivators and values are helps us avoid judging others. Instead we learn to accept that people think differently than and are motivated differently than we are. Thus it shields us from the hazards of being a critical person.

But if that awareness doesn’t happen, having a judgmental, critical spirit leads you to be controlling of others.

This is based in fear. You see, if your story is that you are right and you are the expert, then you automatically limit your growth to learn and evolve as a person. People learn and grow from their mistakes of judgment.

If you are always right and never wrong, you are probably a very small thinker who believes you are the smartest person in the room. This often leads to an unprofitable business, a depressed life, and an unhappy marriage full of blind spots and joy killers.

If any of this even remotely describes your situation, we need to talk!

Your Coach,

sig_shandel

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Motivating a Judgmental Attitude

The brain naturally gravitates toward the negative. We have been talking about the perils of a judgmental attitude and how it is a cancer in relationships. Every working person knows how it wreaks havoc in the workplace and sends everyone home in a bad mood. As leaders we need to train people to think differently and arm them with tools to think positively and appreciate diversity of thought.

In our leadership development workshops, the most helpful tool we have is the Personal Motivation and Engagement assessment. Have you taken it yet? If not, talk to me!

We use this to identify a person’s top six motivators, which are made up of one’s beliefs, attitudes and values.

Your top two motivators are what get you out of bed in the morning, excited to take action on something that brings you joy — like making money, learning something new, helping a person in need, or making an impact on a large scale. The top two motivators are what we use to think positively, to move toward things we value.

Conversely, our bottom motivators may cause us to be judgmental and to be trapped in our own negative world of criticism. If we are not aware of what motivates us and equally what “de-motivates” us, we are in danger of criticizing others when they think and behave differently than we do.

Awareness of what our motivators and values are helps us avoid judging others. Instead we learn to accept that people think differently than and are motivated differently than we are. Thus it shields us from the hazards of being a critical person.

But if that awareness doesn’t happen, having a judgmental, critical spirit leads you to be controlling of others.

This is based in fear. You see, if your story is that you are right and you are the expert, then you automatically limit your growth to learn and evolve as a person. People learn and grow from their mistakes of judgment.

If you are always right and never wrong, you are probably a very small thinker who believes you are the smartest person in the room. This often leads to an unprofitable business, a depressed life, and an unhappy marriage full of blind spots and joy killers.

If any of this even remotely describes your situation, we need to talk!

Your Coach,

sig_shandel